cane corso
Cane Corso

Also known as the Italian Mastiff, the Cane Corso is a large breed of mastiff, originally bred to hunt wild boar and protect property. The breed  is characterized by their short fur and strong, muscular build, similar to that of the close cousin breed, the Neapolitan Mastiff. The Cane Corso lacks the skin folds and drooling nature of the Neapolitan but retains many of the same traits. The breed is very rare in Australia.

Facts

Personality: The high energy Cane Corso is completely devoted to their family or owners and no one else outside of that sphere. The dog is hardworking and can’t be left to his own devices. The highly intelligent breed require training and socialization from a young age to avoid destructive behaviours later in life.

cane corso

A great dog for: Experienced dog owners who are willing to train and can handle a large dog. They breed make a great work companion, especially for farmers.

Favourite activities: Digging, training, working, helping owners on jobs and playing.

Backyard requirements: The Cane Corso requires a large and securely fenced backyard. Don’t expect this breed to sit still for very long.

Breed Care

Grooming: The short coat of the Corso sheds once to twice a year and requires brushing weekly. Ears and eyes should also be checked weekly for any signs of infection. The breed are stubborn and should be trained to learn bathing and grooming requirements from a young age to avoid developing a dislike for them.

cane corso

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Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog

Bred to work, the Stumpy Tail Australian Cattle dog is much like the other beloved breed of Australian Cattle dog, possessing personality traits the breed are famous for. In total, three breeds were crossbred to create the “Stumpy” as it is known locally, they include the Australian dingo, the British Smithfield and the German Coolie. The Stumpy is characterized by its stumpy tail, blue coat and work ethic.

Facts

Personality: The Stumpy is a very loyal and hard working breed. To owners the stumpy truly is man’s best friend. A courageous dog suspicious of strangers, the Stumpy won’t give up on hard work and won’t back down from defending its owners. The obedient breed is intelligent and won’t act unless commanded to do so.

A great dog for: Farmers with cattle and energetic owners. These dogs love to work.

Favourite activities: Working, herding cattle and long daily walks.

Backyard requirements: The Stumpy is not suited to apartment living and needs a large amount of backyard space to keep energetic. The hardworking breed require a job to keep them busy. High fences are a must as the Stumpy is great at hurdles. They also love to dig and burrow if they get bored.

Breed Care

Grooming: The Stumpy’s coat is short and weather resistant so requires minimal grooming. They need to be bathed only when necessary and their coat groomed with a firm bristle brush. Some dogs will shed depending on their sex and the region they live.

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Australian-Stumpy-Tail-pup

Irish Setter
Irish Setter

The Irish Setter originated as a gun dog in Ireland but their rich mahogany coat quickly attracted the attention of dog lovers everywhere. The Setter will carry itself with poise and grace but maintains a very muscular build and active persona. Popular in dog shows and competitions, the breed are very competitive and successful.

Facts

Personality: The Irish Setter is an incredibly friendly breed who gets along well with other dog breeds. Always a pup at heart, the breed thrive from early training and keeping active.

A great dog for: The Irish Setter makes a great addition to the family, especially a young and active family. The breed need to be exercised at least twice daily and with the family for as much of the day as possible. As a social breed, the Irish Setter can become destructive when left alone for too long.

Favourite activities: Playing, running, spending time with the family and socializing.

Backyard requirements: The breed need to be kept active to avoid boredom which will lead to destructive behaviours. A large and fenced backyard is required to keep this pooch active throughout the day. However the Irish Setter is not an outdoor dog. They need to be indoors and close to the family, especially at night.

Irish SetterBreed Care

Grooming: Daily brushing will keep the Irish Setter’s coat from becoming tangled. The coat should be trimmed between the pads of the feet and around the ears by a professional occasionally.

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Newfoundland
Newfoundland

The Newfoundland, or Newie, is one of the gentle giants of the dog world. They are a large breed and have a thick coat, resembling a teddy bear as a pup. As members of the working dog group, the Newfoundland was used to hunt and help fishermen. A strong swimmer with a strong work ethic, the Newie is also a slobber dog.

Facts

Personality: The Newfoundland is considered a gentle giant with a mellow attitude. They have a strong work ethic, high intelligence and protective nature, especially around young children. The breed are considered one of the friendliest.

A great dog for: Families with young children will find the Newie to be a great companion and watch dog. Small toddlers will need to be monitored around the breed as their large size makes them clumsy.

Favourite activities: Swimming, frolicking and lazing around.

Backyard requirements: As with all large dogs, the Newfoundland needs space. A colder climate is best as their thick coat can often cause them to overheat. They can adapt to warmer climates if they have a fan or air conditioner to sit in front of. They are adaptable to apartment living, provided they receive daily exercise.

Newfoundland puppy

Breed Care

Grooming: The breed are one of the more higher maintenance dogs in terms of grooming. Their coat needs to be brushed a number of times a week as they shed moderately. Bathing occasionally is sufficient and dry shampoo can be used when brushing the coat to avoid stripping the coat of its natural oils.

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Tibetan Mastiff
Tibetan Mastiff

Believed to be one of the oldest dog breeds in the world, the Tibetan Mastiff was first record hundreds of years ago in Tibet. The breed is strong built and characterised by their long and thick double coat and curled over fluffy tail. The Mastiff was originally bred to help manage livestock. Although the working dog still exists in the breed today, they often make companions or show dogs.

Facts

Personality: Without early socialisation, the Tibetan Mastiff can become over-protective, stubborn and in some cases, aggressive. Extensive training and patience will help the Mastiff find their place within the family to avoid destructive behaviours in their adult life.

A great dog for: The Tibetan Mastiff’s high tendancies to bark and distrust of strangers make them a great guard dog. They are also very good with young children and full of energy.

Favourite activities: Walks during the morning or evening when they are most active, sleeping and barking.

Backyard requirements: The Tibetan Mastiff will grow into a large dog so it’s not a suitable apartment breed. These dogs need their outdoor space. However, if left outside during the night, the Mastiff will bark so an indoor bed is more appropriate. 

Tibetan Mastiff Puppy

Breed Care

Grooming: The Tibetan Mastiff’s thick double coat needs to be groomed a couple of times a week. They start shedding their undercoat and malt before summer so excessive grooming and combing is required to keep the coat tangle free.

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Valley Bulldog
Valley Bulldog

Also known as the Bull Boxer, the Valley Bulldog is derived from a cross breed of the English Bulldog and the Boxer. The distinguishing characteristics of this breed include their broad head, muscular stature, thick neck and broad shoulders. Their short coat is commonly brindle, solid white, fawn or a mixture of those colours.

Facts

Personality: These athletic dogs have a funny and playful personality. The Valley Bulldog thrives on human interaction and isn’t afraid to show their love and loyalty to their owners. If raised indoors they also develop a protective nature.

A great dog for: Clean by nature and very low maintenance, the Valley Bulldog makes a great addition to the family. They have a lot of energy so they make a great companion for active children. The Valley Bulldog will assume responsibility and guardianship of young children, keeping them safe.

Favourite activities: Playing, getting pats, long walks and chew toys.

Backyard requirements: The Valley Bulldog is of medium size so they can handle living indoors. A brisk, long walk will help them keep fit and avoid destructive behaviour. They are also comfortable living outdoors with room for exercise as long as they are paid attention.

Breed Care

Grooming: With a short coat and minimal shedding, the Valley Bulldog doesn’t require much grooming. Baths are only necessary if they get dirty and they can be wiped down with a wet cloth. The skin fold around the face, tail and genitals needs to be cleaned and dried regularly to avoid infection.

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Bulldog-adult
Bulldog

Considered a symbol of strength, the British Bulldog has earned its place as the national dog of England.

Also called the English Bulldog and British Bulldog, this breed has been around since ancient Egypt and has evolved into a good natured, family-oriented dog. One of the defining features of the breed is their rolling skin. Due to its eccentric short build and sideways motion when walking, the Bulldog is susceptible to many health issues relating to the joints, bones, respiratory system and eyes.

Facts

Personality: Originally bred for bull baiting, the British Bulldog is an amazing dog with strength and intelligence. These traits are coupled with a great temperament and an extremely laid-back personality to form a breed that has become the mascot for numerous universities, schools and organisations. Affection is one of the attributes most commonly noted about this adorable dog.

Suitability: The breed generally loves everything to do with families and wants nothing more than the affection and attention of its owners. The British Bulldog loves to be with children and also makes a great companion dog. They are well-suited to a family living in a home with a small backyard or courtyard area with plenty of shade.

Favourite activities: The British Bulldog doesn’t need a lot of exercise, but does like a walk or a romp on the beach. They enjoy being indoors and can easily overheat. A boisterous young pup, this playful breed calms down as it grows up. The Bulldog likes to be involved in whatever its owner is doing and isn’t particularly fussed about specific activities. They generally prefer to have a cuddle with a member of the family.

Watchdog qualities: Alert and inquisitive, this breed will alert the owner if anyone is around. They rarely bark, so when they do it grabs people’s attention. Their stubborn nature and strength mean they should make a good guard dog.

Hereditary diseases: Prone to overheating, the British Bulldog should never be left in a hot car. They are known to drool and snore. As with all breeds, they can inherit problems such as hip dysplasia.

Breed Care

Grooming: The Bulldog requires regular brushing to avoid the build up of dirt and grime in their skin folds. Wrinkles and the skin surrounding the eyes as well as the tail should be cleaned regularly to avoid moisture and infection.

Daily: Shade, fresh water and a well-balanced diet are essential. This breed is prone to overheating so it should have an area indoors where it can rest.

Weekly: Brush every week and bathe when necessary. Clean the face, wrinkles and ears.

Other: Make sure your British Bulldog is wormed, vaccinated and regularly checked for ticks.

Bulldog-puppy

 

Young-bulldog

 

Bulldog-young

 

 

Bulldog-adult

English Mastiff
English Mastiff

Also known as Old English Mastiff, the English Mastiff is a dignified, quiet and calm breed who craves companionship. Depicted in Ancient Egyptian art, the Mastiff is one of the oldest and largest dog breeds. Their size alone is enough to dominate and is their only watchdog trait.

Facts

Personality: The lovable English Mastiff craves attention. Often called the gentle giant, these guys love to lean up against your legs for a pat and attention. Although the breed are intelligent, they need patience when trained at a young age. They excel at training and consider the human the leader, however they tend to be stubborn.

A great dog for: The gentle giant is docile in nature and doesn’t bark much. They are perfect for families with children and space.

Favourite activities: Regular, daily walks, sleeping and lazing around.

Backyard requirements: As a large built breed, the Mastiff needs its space. A large backyard is a must so they have room to stretch their body. Avoid having the English Mastiff in the house if you want to maintain a clean and tidy space, the English Mastiff is known to drool and slobber.

Puppy English Mastiff

Breed Care

Grooming: The English Mastiff’s short coat requires little grooming and sheds moderately. Weekly grooming of the coat is recommended.

Akita
Akita

 

 

Akita

Achieving some 70cm in height and 50+ kilos, the Akita is, and looks, a dignified, powerful, graceful large dog with a relatively short but very dense coat, small pricked ears and thick tail tightly curled over the back. Although amenable to training, this is not a breed for the novice dog-owner.

Breed Care

Big dogs need lots of space and the Akita is no exception. Room to run and play, to get all the exercise they need to keep fit and healthy in both body and mind, which in this case is a fair bit. Socialisation is vital with the Akita and must go hand in hand with obedience training.
Coat care in this breed is relatively simple, involving thorough brushing of the short, stiff outer coat every day or two and keeping the dead undercoat moving during the twice-a-year coat change.