Norwegian Elkhound
Norwegian Elkhound

The Norwegian Elkhound is one of the most ancient dog breeds in the world, originally used to hunt elk or moose. The breed possesses traits from both hound and spitz breeds, making them playful and hardworking by nature. The Elkhound is characterized by their thick double coat, upright ears and broad head. The breed are built to withstand the cold and snowy conditions of the Nordic region.

Facts

Personality: The Norwegian Elkhound is extremely energetic and has a bold and independent personality. Training from a young age is required to avoid bad and destructive behaviour in later years. Although not aggressive by nature, the breed make great watchdogs, cornering intruders or animals they perceive as a threat. The Elkhound is a headstrong breed and requires patients when training.

A great dog for: The breed make the perfect companion for energetic owners who are willing to spend time training and exercising their dog. Experienced dog owners will find the breed to make a great companion.

Favourite activities: Playing hard and exercising. Hunting and chasing qualities are still present in the breed so they tend to chase cats and other game animals.

Backyard requirements: Prone to destructive chewing and with high levels of energy, the Norwegian Elkhound requires room to move. A medium backyard will provide adequate space if exercised regularly.

Norwegian Elkhound

Breed Care

Grooming: The Norwegian Elkhound’s unique double coat sheds a lot, losing its entire coat at least twice a year with season changes. During the season changes, brushing is required daily, otherwise weekly brushing will suffice. Ears should also be checked regularly for wax build up.

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Otterhound
Otterhound

The Otterhound is a large work and hunting dog, bred for their sense of smell and stamina. Today the breed is characterised by their keen nose and shaggy coat which grows low on their face. Their infamous outer and under coat is easily managed.

Facts

Personality: Friendly with humans and all other dogs, the Otterhound is a great addition to the family. However their hunting instincts will take over when other animals are around so care should be taken when walking them. Although an intelligent breed, the Otterhound will take a lot of patience to train.

A great dog for: Active dog owners and families.

Favourite activities: Swimming, running, playing, hunting, jogging and chasing after smells.

Backyard requirements: The Otterhound is an extremely active breed and will choose to jog rather than walk alongside their human companion. They should be allowed to swim as often as possible as it is one of the exercises they are best at and has the lowest risk of injury. The Otterhound will require a large and well-fenced backyard to avoid then slipping through when chasing a scent. A good jumper, the breed will be able to jump most common fences so they will need to be strong and tall. They are able to live indoors with the family as long as they are exercised regularly.

Breed Care

Grooming: The Otterhound’s coat should be combed weekly but can be washed as needed. Their beard should be washed more regularly. There is minimal shedding and no trimming required.

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Borzoi - Russian - Wolfhound
Borzoi

Commonly referred to as the Russian Wolfhound, the Borzoi has been used for hunting wolves, foxes and rabbits since the early 17th century. Shaped much like a greyhound, the breed is characterized by their long muzzle and nose. The Borzoi walks with a proud strut making this an elegant dog, associated with aristocracy.

Facts

Personality: The Borzoi is an intelligent breed of hound which is proud and very loyal to their family. The Borzoi is an old hunting breed and will never grow out of its hunting tenancies. Good around other dog breeds, the hound will need to be socialized with other non-canine animals at a young age to avoid chasing them, however they will likely continue to chase after a fleeting animal into their adult life.

Borzoi - Russian - Wolfhound

A great dog for: The Borzoi is good natured but hesitant with children as they don’t enjoy rough play time. They thrive in training but require a patient owner.

Favourite activities: Training, long daily walks, hunting and running.

Backyard requirements: All hound breeds require large amounts of open space however these dogs can adapt to indoor living provided they are taken on long daily walks.

Borzoi - Russian - Wolfhound

Breed Care

Grooming: The Borzoi sheds a moderate amount of hair and their coat needs to be groomed regularly. The fur is easy to brush with dry shampoo. The hair between the pads on their feet will also need to be trimmed frequently.

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Borzoi - Russian - Wolfhound
Russian Wolfhound

Known as the Borzoi, the Russian Wolfhound has been used for hunting wolves, foxes and rabbits since the early 17th century. Shaped much like a greyhound, the breed is characterized by their long muzzle and nose. The Russian Wolfhound walks with a proud strut making this an elegant dog, associated with aristocracy.

Facts

Personality: The Russian Wolfhound is an intelligent breed of hound which is proud and very loyal to their family. The Russian Wolfhound is an old hunting breed and will never grow out of its hunting tenancies. Good around other dog breeds, the hound will need to be socialized with other non-canine animals at a young age to avoid chasing them, however they will likely continue to chase after a fleeting animal into their adult life.

Borzoi - Russian - Wolfhound

A great dog for: The Russian Wolfhound is good natured but hesitant with children as they don’t enjoy rough play time. They thrive in training but require a patient owner.

Favourite activities: Training, long daily walks, hunting and running.

Backyard requirements: All hound breeds require large amounts of open space however these dogs can adapt to indoor living provided they are taken on long daily walks.

Borzoi - Russian - Wolfhound

Breed Care

Grooming: The Russian Wolfhound sheds a moderate amount of hair and their coat needs to be groomed regularly. The fur is easy to brush with dry shampoo. The hair between the pads on their feet will also need to be trimmed frequently.

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Bulldog-adult
Bulldog

Considered a symbol of strength, the British Bulldog has earned its place as the national dog of England.

Also called the English Bulldog and British Bulldog, this breed has been around since ancient Egypt and has evolved into a good natured, family-oriented dog. One of the defining features of the breed is their rolling skin. Due to its eccentric short build and sideways motion when walking, the Bulldog is susceptible to many health issues relating to the joints, bones, respiratory system and eyes.

Facts

Personality: Originally bred for bull baiting, the British Bulldog is an amazing dog with strength and intelligence. These traits are coupled with a great temperament and an extremely laid-back personality to form a breed that has become the mascot for numerous universities, schools and organisations. Affection is one of the attributes most commonly noted about this adorable dog.

Suitability: The breed generally loves everything to do with families and wants nothing more than the affection and attention of its owners. The British Bulldog loves to be with children and also makes a great companion dog. They are well-suited to a family living in a home with a small backyard or courtyard area with plenty of shade.

Favourite activities: The British Bulldog doesn’t need a lot of exercise, but does like a walk or a romp on the beach. They enjoy being indoors and can easily overheat. A boisterous young pup, this playful breed calms down as it grows up. The Bulldog likes to be involved in whatever its owner is doing and isn’t particularly fussed about specific activities. They generally prefer to have a cuddle with a member of the family.

Watchdog qualities: Alert and inquisitive, this breed will alert the owner if anyone is around. They rarely bark, so when they do it grabs people’s attention. Their stubborn nature and strength mean they should make a good guard dog.

Hereditary diseases: Prone to overheating, the British Bulldog should never be left in a hot car. They are known to drool and snore. As with all breeds, they can inherit problems such as hip dysplasia.

Breed Care

Grooming: The Bulldog requires regular brushing to avoid the build up of dirt and grime in their skin folds. Wrinkles and the skin surrounding the eyes as well as the tail should be cleaned regularly to avoid moisture and infection.

Daily: Shade, fresh water and a well-balanced diet are essential. This breed is prone to overheating so it should have an area indoors where it can rest.

Weekly: Brush every week and bathe when necessary. Clean the face, wrinkles and ears.

Other: Make sure your British Bulldog is wormed, vaccinated and regularly checked for ticks.

Bulldog-puppy

 

Young-bulldog

 

Bulldog-young

 

 

Bulldog-adult

Wire Fox Terrier
Wire Fox Terrier

The Wire Fox Terrier is said to have originated in the mid 19th century as a cross between the Airedale Terrier, Bull Terriers, Greyhounds and Beagles. Their distinguishing features include their narrow head and dense, wired coat. Originally bred to assist in the hunting of vermin and foxes, the Wire Fox Terrier now makes a great companion.

Facts

Personality: The lively and energetic Wire Fox Terrier is both brave and bold. They absolutely love their family and will do anything to protect them. Much like other terriers, the Wire Fox is intelligent but stubborn. Training is important from a very young age to avoid bad behaviour in the future. They like to play rough so make sure they’re treated to outdoor games and long walks. If possible, it’s a good idea to let the Wire Fox off the leash to run, however they will chase smaller dogs so be vigilant.

A great dog for: Affectionate and protective, the Wire Fox is great for families with young children with time and energy to play with the dog outdoors.

Favourite activities: Playing games, staying active, fetch, long walks, running, playing with children.

Backyard requirements: The larger the space the better for the Wire Fox Terrier. However, they can adapt to apartment living as long as they’re taken on long daily walks. A backyard is preferred.

Wire Fox Terrier

Breed Care

Grooming: The Wire Fox Terrier requires a lot of grooming to look its best. Hand trimming their coat is necessary several times a year, best done by a professional. To keep the double-layered coat tangle free, the coat requires brushing a couple of times a week.

Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Courageous Chesapeake

Originally used for retrieving game in Chesapeake Bay on the East Coast of America, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever of today makes an affectionate and loyal companion, as Lauren Taylor discovers.

The Chesapeake Bay Retriever was developed in 1807, when an English ship crashed off the coast of Maryland. Everyone on board was saved, along with two Newfoundlands, which were given to a family of dog lovers. These dogs were later mated with local retrievers and were used for hunting in the Chesapeake Bay. Careful breeding then took place over the next few years and created an outstanding retriever with incredible enthusiasm and endurance.

This breed has a large, sturdy, athletic build and impressive muscle tone. It is believed that the Chesapeake Bay Retriever has been known to retrieve 200 ducks in a single day. Today, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever makes a fine family companion and excels in tracking, hunting, field sports and obedience.

Friendly and affectionate
The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is known to be extremely affectionate, high-spirited and loyal. They are very friendly, intelligent and loving. This breed is a marvellous companion. Just ask Trevor Lodder, who has been involved with the breed for 25 years. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is alert, intelligent, independent, happy, devoted, protective and willing to work, says Lodder. They are best suited to an active person who enjoys outdoor activities.

A child-friendly dog
These trustworthy dogs get along wonderfully with children and other dogs, but as with all breeds, children should be supervised at all times. Once a Chesapeake Bay Retriever becomes a member of the family, the dog accepts all members of the family, whether they are human or animal. A well-socialised pup will readily accept any other pets as part of its kingdom.
This breed is a one-family dog with a very strong protective nature for what belongs to them or their adopted family; this makes them excellent watchdogs. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is such a good guard dog that the Lodders don’t have to worry about locking the car when at the shops. They will guard the vehicle, and not let anyone near if their owner is not near, Lodder tells Dogs Life. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever does have an independent streak and will think for itself, so its best suited to a confident handler who commands authority.
The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is a cheerful breed with a bright and happy disposition. They love human companionship and thrive on human attention. They do not adapt well to solitary life in a backyard, preferring to be inside with the family.
This breed requires an average-sized backyard that is fully fenced, along with a great deal of daily vigorous activity. The Chesapeake loves the outdoors, especially water. Not enough exercise will cause the dog to become badly behaved and destructive. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is not recommended for apartment life, as they are relatively active indoors.

Eager to please
This loving breed is very intelligent, quick to learn and always eager to please, but can easily get bored and sometimes may have a mind of its own. It is recommended to keep training sessions short, fun and consistent, without excessive repetition. They are quite sensitive, so don’t respond well to harsh training.
The Chesapeake Bay Retriever responds well to a systematic approach, and requires basic obedience training to show whos boss; they can be stubborn at times, warns Lodder.

Grooming and genetics
The dense, harsh, short-haired coat of the Chesapeake Bay Retriever is easy to groom. Weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush to remove the dead hairs is adequate. It is recommended this breed is not washed with soap or detergent, as this will remove the natural protective oil, which waterproofs the coat.
The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is generally robust and quite a healthy breed, but a very small percentage can suffer from hip and elbow dysplasia and progressive retinal atrophy, although responsible breeders test for all these conditions and breed only from stock they believe will return good results. Most breeders take time to study the bloodlines with the intent of eventually breeding these problems out of their bloodlines.

 

Breed Contacts

For more information, contact the Australian National Kennel Council at www.ankc.org.au
In New Zealand, please contact the New Zealand Kennel Club via www.nzkc.org.nz